Preparing For Eternity Where Did Halloween
Come From?


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WITH the loving approval of their parents, children dress up in weird costumes and play pranks on Halloween night--little realizing that for over a thousand years this one evening in the year has been specially dedicated by spirit mediums and witches to the worship of Satan.

Halloween has nothing to do with Christianity. It is a festival which no one—child or adult—should have anything to do with. We need to better understand the origins of Halloween and its dangers.

During the Dark Ages, a number of pagan customs were adopted by the dominant Christian church in Europe. One of these was devil night, which was later named, "Halloween." This special night, celebrated since antiquity as the night when the devils came out and walked about the streets, was a satanic festival on October 31 of each year. The next day was called "All Saints Day" or "All Hallows Day", so "Halloween" was the night before Saints’ day. Like the night before it, All Hallows Day was dedicated to honoring the dead.

Celtic-Druid Influence On Halloween

The ancient Celtic empire extended to Europe, England and Ireland. The Druids were Celtic priests. The Celts and their Druid priests chose October 31st for their New Year's Eve, and "intended it as a celebration of everything wicked, evil, and dead. During their celebration they would gather around a community bonfire and offer as sacrifice their animals, their crops, and sometimes themselves. The celebration remained much the same after the Romans captured the Celts (43 A.D.)," (World Book)

Did you know that the Druid priests held sacred the hours of midnight and noon? The Gaulish (French) word, druides, might be derived from the word druvides meaning "those who know the oak." The oak tree and the mistletoe were considered to be sacred, also. The Druids forecasted events both by interpreting the flight of birds and by examining the markings on the entrails, the liver, and other inner organs of sacrificed animals.

The folklore of early Ireland depicts Druids as a priesthood, offering human sacrifice. One of the chief Druid doctrines which is prevalent today, according to the Encyclopedia Americana, was their decisions "to inspire a belief that men's souls do not perish but transmigrate after death from one individual to another." This is a very serious Satanic practice. Many people today believe in the transmigration of souls. We hear them interviewed on radio and television shows. They believe they existed in a former life.

The Druids were Satanic to the core in their worship and pagan practices. Halloween is a Druid holiday that we in America have received from Satanic paganism. It was "baptized" so to speak, and accepted by the Roman Catholic church in the early A.D. 700's. Its name was changed into "All Hallow's Day" which means "All Saints Day." That's November 1st. And "Hallow's Eve," the evening before the "Hallow's Day," is October 31st or "Hallow'en, " Hallow evening," or "Halloween."

Celebrations of all kinds took place. In Ireland, carvings on pumpkins were made, and called Jack-O-Laterns. The legend was that a man named Jack had played practical jokes on the devil and bothered him, so the devil kept him out of heaven. Jack, therefore, had to live forever on earth carrying a lit lantern, warning people not to offend the devil. The lesson for little children: do not offend the devil.

It Soon Seemed As If All The Devils Came Out!

Yet such teachings did not help either the people nor the morals of society. Throughout Europe, on this one night of the year, it soon seemed as if all the devils came out! Indeed, that was the hidden meaning of Halloween, and the wild excitement and orgies of the people on that night seemed to fulfill it.

The Druids believed that on Halloween, ghosts, spirits, fairies, witches, and elves came out to harm people. These evil creatures must be placated with offerings of food. The Celts would go with their children to one another’s house to gather food for the devil gods.

Animals were feared on that night also. Dogs, owls, snakes, and pigs were particularly worshipped in fear on that night, but among them, the cat was regarded with a special veneration. The Druid priests taught that cats—especially black ones—were sacred. This is why, today, we think of cats, as well as skeletons, pumpkins, skulls, and children with sheets over their heads, when we think of Halloween.

The Celtic priests also taught that witches ride on brooms through the skies on that night, and fling down curses on those who do not honor the dead by taking part in the ritual ceremonies of that night.

This Holiday Originated In Paganism - Not Christianity

After being adopted by nominal Christianity in the Dark Ages, the festival of Halloween spread throughout Europe and to most countries later colonized by them. Yet few today are aware that this holiday originated in paganism, not Christianity, and that it is the most dangerous "holiday" in the year. For long ages, Halloween has been a night especially dedicated to satanic agencies. Every October 31 we see the clearest evidence of that fact.

Vandalism on a major scale now plagues our cities on that night. A few years ago, Detroit alone experienced three days of riots, arson, and mass destruction. For three days children and adults seemed possessed, and the city seemed out of control.

Should we today celebrate this pagan night, which every witch, clairvoyant, wizard, and spirit medium will tell you is the outstanding occultic night in the year? It may seem like fun and games. You may be saying now, the information above may be well and fine, but we do not worship the devil and I see nothing wrong with it. Well, don’t forget that it is still "Satan’s Holiday." Far better to keep our children home on that night, and pray to God and read the Bible! Dedicate your life anew to the true God, and shun the amusements and follies of the devil gods. Although very inviting, they will only bring you trouble and misery, confusion of mind and an empty life without happiness.

Few people realize how very dangerous it is to dabble in spiritualism. It may seem like innocent fun, but is it? Lets look at what God’s Word says about it:

"When thou art come into the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, thou shalt not learn to do after the abominations of those nations. There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, Or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. For all that do these things are an abomination unto the LORD: and because of these abominations the LORD thy God doth drive them out from before thee." Deuteronomy 18:9-12.

They Are All An Abomination To God

Did you notice that it is talking about fortune telling, horoscopes, trying to communicate with the dead, etc. They are all an abomination to God, and we need to avoid them.

Some Bible Verses To Consider With Halloween

"And have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove them." Ephesians 5:11.

"Abstain from all appearance of evil." 1 Thessalonians 5:22.

"When thou art come into the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, thou shalt not learn to do after the abominations of those nations. There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of time, or an enchanter, or a witch, Or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. For all that do these things are an abomination unto the LORD: and because of these abominations the LORD thy God doth drive them out from before thee." Deuteronomy 18:9-12.
(This Scriptural injunction in Deuteronomy 18 strictly forbade the people of Israel from having anything to do with the Satanic practices of their Canaanite neighbors. This is a Scriptural principle to follow.)

"Regard not them that have familiar spirits, neither seek after wizards, to be defiled by them; I am the LORD your God." Leviticus 19:31.

"And many that believed came, and confessed, and shewed their deeds. Many of them also which used curious arts brought their books together, and burned them before all men: and they counted the price of them, and found it fifty thousand pieces of silver." Acts 19:18-19.

Abbreviated History and Customs of Halloween

Oxford English Dictionary (Second Edition)
Hallowe'en. The eve of All Hallows' or All Saints' Day celebrated the last night of October. In the Old Celtic calendar the year began on November 1, so that the last evening of October was 'old years' night', the night of all the witches, which the Church transformed into the Eve of All Saints."

Encyclopedia Britannica (14th Edition)
"Hallowe’en or All Hallows Eve, the name given to Oct. 31, as the vigil of Hallowmas or All Saints' Day, now chiefly known as the eve of the Christian festival. It long antedates Christianity. The two chief characteristics of ancient Hallowe'en were the lighting of bonfires and the belief that this is the one night in the year during which ghosts and witches are most likely to wander abroad. History shows that the main celebrations of Hallowe'en were purely Druidical, and this is further proved by the fact that in parts of Ireland Oct. 31 is still known as Oidhche Shamhna, 'Vigil of Sama'. This is directly connected with the Druidic belief in the calling together of certain wicked souls on Hallowe'en by Saman, lord of death."

World Book Encyclopedia (1959 Edition)
"The Druids, an order of priests in ancient Gaul and Britain, believed that on Halloween, ghosts, spirits, fairies, witches, and elves came out to harm people. They thought the cat was sacred and believed that cats had once been human beings but were changed as a punishment for evil deeds. From these Druidic beliefs come the present-day use of witches, ghosts, and cats in Halloween festivities."

Halloween Through Twenty Centuries (by Ralph Linton)
"The American celebration rests upon Scottish and Irish folk customs which can be traced in direct line from pre-Christian times. Although Halloween has become a night of rollicking fun, superstitious spells, and eerie games which people take only half seriously, its beginnings were quite otherwise. The earliest Halloween celebrations were held by the Druids in honor of Samhain, Lord of the dead, whose festival fell on November 1."

World Book Encyclopedia (Quoted in the Atlanta Journal
on October 16, 1977)

"It was the Celts who chose the date of October 31 as their new year’s Eve and who originally intended it as a celebration of everything wicked, evil and dead. Also during their celebration they would gather around a community bonfire and offer as sacrifice their animals, their crops, and sometime themselves. And wearing costumes made from the heads and skins of other animals, they would also tell one another’s fortunes for the coming year."

"The celebration remained much the same after the Romans conquered the Celts around 43 A.D. The Romans did, however, add a ceremony honoring their goddess of fruit and trees and thus the association with apples and the custom of bobbing for them."

World Book Encyclopedia (1959 Edition)
"In the A.D. 800’s the church established All Saints Day on November 1 so that the people could continue a festival they had celebrated before becoming Christians. The mass that was said on this day was called Allhallowmas. The evening before became known as All Hallow e'ven or Halloween…. It means hallowed or holy evening."

World Book Encyclopedia (1959 Edition)
"Jack-O'-Lanterns were named for a man called Jack, who could not enter heaven or hell. As a result, he was doomed to wander in darkness with his lantern until Judgment Day."

Compton’s Encyclopedia (1978 Edition)
"Customs and superstitions gathered through the ages go into our celebration of Halloween, or 'Holy Eve', on October 31. The day is so named because it is the even of the festival of All Saints, but many of the beliefs and observances connected with it arose long before the Christian Era, in the autumn festivals of pagan peoples…. Even after November 1 became a Christian feast day, honoring all saints, the peasants clung to the old pagan beliefs and customs that had grown up about Halloween…. Our Halloween celebrations today keep many of these early customs unchanged."

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